Business Strategies

Often when “strategic planning” is mentioned, most people roll their eyes. I know that I used to.  To me strategic planning meant a round of meetings talking about mission statements and wishes and lofty goals for the future.  Then it was all written out and placed in a fancy binder--which then sat in a file drawer gathering dust.  There was a huge disconnect between the process of developing a strategic plan, and the actual implementation or what it meant to daily operations.  


When things start to go badly, the plan is ignored because we don’t have time to be strategic--we need to get things back on track.  And when things are going well, why fix something that’s not broken, so we ignore the plan and keep things rolling.  At one point you  may reach into the

As the leader of your company, you need to set an objective that’s more than a financial goal.  You need a purpose and goal that can inspire your team to work toward it.  To do that you need the right products, the right people helping you, and know where the revenue is.  

drawer to review the plan, but it’s no longer applicable because you didn’t put the plan into action, so the process has to start all over again.  Another eye roll.

 

But a few years ago, I had an epiphany.  Hope is not a strategy.  Working harder is not a strategy.  Doing the same thing again and again and expecting a different result each time is a sign of madness. Change is inevitable.  You don’t fly without a flight plan.  No one is going to follow you until they know where you are going.  

 

So call it strategic planning, or business strategies, or a game plan, or scope of work or project management--you can’t go forward unless you know where you are starting, where you want to be, and have a plan to get there. 

 

As the leader of your company, you need to set an objective that’s more than a financial goal.  You need a purpose and goal that can inspire your team to work toward it.  To do that you need the right products, the right people helping you, and know where the revenue is.  

 

One of my greatest strengths is strategy--and I can help you develop one for your business.  A strategy that won’t sit in a drawer, or try to hold you to unrealistic goals.  A strategy that can make your operations leaner, your staff more productive, and generate revenue.  It will be up to you to implement it, but I can coach you through it.